Tagged: Uncle Elmer

Thirty years ago, WrestleMania 2 put people to sleep

This year marks the 30th anniversary of WrestleMania 2, a lousy card that took place on April 7, 1986.

I’m not sure what to say about this show. Having just rewatched it recently on the WWE Network, Mania 2 was just as bad today as I remembered it back in the day. Even by 1980s standards, the matches felt rushed and there was no showstealer that you’d expect to see today.

This may have been the worst WrestleMania ever, with the only possible competition being WrestleMania IX.

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The event — which took place on a Monday night — emanated from three arenas: Nassau Coliseum in Long Island, NY; Rosemont Horizon (now the Allstate Arena) outside of Chicago; and Los Angeles Sports Arena.

Vince McMahon — who clearly believed Continue reading

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The top five lamest 1980s WWF promos

There’s been an awful lot of talk about how some longtime pro wrestling stars, such as the Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Jerry “The King” Lawler, have swooped into angles on WWE Monday Night Raw and delivered promos better than anyone else on the current roster.

Let’s face it: The on-the-job training for interviews was a lot better in yesteryear. In the 1980s, the WWF had a lot of wrestlers and managers who could talk well on the microphone. People like Roddy Piper, Randy “Macho Man” Savage, Hulk Hogan, and Jake “The Snake” Roberts understood how to push matches and angles.

However, more than a few promos in that decade were stinkers, which made me ponder the worst ones I had heard during the ‘80s. One of my qualifications here is that it had to be an interview that anyone could have seen (so house show promos really can’t count). And a bad segment doesn’t mean you gave a bad promo, as plenty of gifted talkers have been saddled with lousy circumstances (think about some of those corny Saturday Night’s Main Event skits). 

Instead, my choices are reserved for those who truly butchered the art of the pro wrestling promo. With that, below are my five lamest promos from the ‘80s:  Continue reading

Thankfully not on the WWF card in 1985: Ric Flair vs. Pete Doherty, Captain Lou, or Mr. T

Ric Flair’s initial run in the WWF/WWE started in 1991, which thankfully spared us from having to see him fight some pro wrestlers from the 1980s who just weren’t up to the task.

For example, can you imagine Captain Lou Albano wrestling his annual Boston Garden “special attraction” match against the “Nature Boy”? Flair would have sold for Albano (maybe Naitch even would have allowed Captain Lou to bodyslam him off the top rope), and the race would have been on to see who could bleed first.

I have more thoughts about the crazy foes Flair missed out on in the 1980s–such as the Red Rooster and Pete “Duke of Dorchester” Doherty–in my article at Camel Clutch Blog, “Eight comical opponents Ric Flair never fought in the 80s’ WWF.”