Tagged: Tito Santana

Bobby Heenan rings the bell during a match to help Hercules

Bobby “The Brain” Heenan was one of those guys in wrestling who had great comedic talent.

Whether you watch some of his classic stuff from the AWA with Nick Bockwinkel and catch him at his best in the WWF (I loved his reaction when Paul Orndorff fired him on Tuesday Night Titans), Heenan could really crack you up.

One of the biggest laughs “The Brain” got out of me occurred in Madison Square Garden in Continue reading

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Savage began his first WWF Heavyweight Title reign 25 years ago at WrestleMania IV

It was 25 years ago today in 1988 that the WWF Heavyweight Title tournament took place at WrestleMania IV.

The tournament came about after the infamous title switch during which Andre the Giant pinned Hulk Hogan and then attempted to bequeath the belt to the “Million Dollar Man” Ted DiBiase. Then-WWF President Jack Tunney ruled that while Andre had indeed won the title, he could not hand it over to someone else, and thus had vacated the belt. Tunney ordered the champion to be determined at Mania IV.

These days, title tournaments are commonplace, but in 1988 in the WWF, there had not been a championship tourney Continue reading

Heel ref Brad Maddox harkens back to the great Danny Davis

There is some interest about where the WWE plotline is heading with crooked referee Brad Maddox, who gave Ryback a low blow at Hell in the Cell, leading to a CM Punk victory.

Maddox brings back memories of perhaps the most infamous heel ref, Danny Davis, who peaked in 1987 with the gimmick.

Davis, who is from New Hampshire, was a longtime referee in the early 1980s for the WWF, often working the house shows at the old Boston Garden. He got wrestling experience in the ring by competing under a mask as Continue reading

Jesse Ventura’s last match in Boston was against “Chico Santana”

I used to get a kick out of Jesse “The Body” Ventura busting Tito Santana’s balls when Ventura served as a heel color commentator on the syndicated Championship Wrestling show, which we saw in Boston every Saturday morning.

Ventura always used to refer to Tito instead as “Chico Santana,” which in turn constantly drew a reaction from straight man commentator Vince McMahon. The exchange went something like this: Continue reading

Big angle in 1981: Greg Valentine suplexes Pedro Morales on the concrete floor

Man, 30 years ago it didn’t take a lot to get an angle over with the audience compared to today. There may be no greater example of that than when Greg “The Hammer” Valentine taunted Intercontinental Champion Pedro Morales into match on TV.

To set the stage, in late 1981 Morales had just regained the Intercontinental belt from the Magnificent Muraco, whom the Grand Wizard managed. The Wizard also tutored Valentine, and after a squash match on Championship Wrestling, Valentine issued a challenge to Morales, including calling the Puerto Rican star a “greaseball.” Yes, those of us who were fans back then occasionally have reasons to hang our heads in shame for real.

Anyway, Morales came out to the accept the challenge as long as he could fight Valentine on free TV so that everyone could see “when I kick your butt, baby!”  To this day, I so distinctly remember Valentine’s reaction Continue reading

Answers to hometown trivia and a funny note about Valentine

In my prior post, I challenged you to remember the 1980s WWF wrestlers who hailed from the hometowns listed below. Here are the answers for those who might have been stumped.

King Kong Mosca mentions his Boston roots in his new autobiography

There’s been a lot of talk among the insider wrestling community in the past week or so about King Kong Mosca, who recently released an autobiography, Tell Me To My Face.

I always get a kick out of the fact that Angelo Mosca was born in Waltham, MA, which is only about 10 miles outside of Boston. That must have been a thrill for him to wrestle on cards in the old Boston Garden.

In his autobiography, Mosca – whose mother was half African American — talks about what it meant growing up in the Boston area as part of a biracial family in the 1940s. “Today, being one-quarter black might not seem like something to hide but, at the time, Continue reading