Tagged: Rick Martel

“What a maneuver” and other great lines from McMahon’s commentary days

I guess every wrestling TV commentator has his sayings that take on a life of their own. Certainly, Jim Ross’ “slobber knocker” phrase is well-known to WWE fans, as is Jerry “The King” Lawler’s penchant for racy suggestions during diva matches.

But no one had more well-remembered one-liners than the chairman himself, Vince McMahon, back when he was the lead commentator on WWF Championship Wrestling in the 1970s and ’80s. Here is a collection of McMahon-isms that I bet many of you can still hear in your mind: Continue reading

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Saturday Night’s Main Event often featured two-of-three-fall contests

This week on Monday Night Raw, we saw Dolph Ziggler retain the U.S. Title against Kofi Kingston in a two-out-of-three falls bout, which is a match not often seen these days in the WWE. Wasn’t that a surprise to see fans vote for that option?

In the 1980s, it was more common to see two-out-of-three falls, particularly when the WWF would displace Saturday Night Live on NBC with Saturday Night’s Main Event.

All of the three-fall contests on Saturday Night’s Main Event occurred in Continue reading

Demolition (eventually) stood apart from the Road Warriors

Demolition debuted as a tag team 25 years ago this month at the old Boston Garden, defeating the Islanders (Haku and Tama, a.k.a. the Tonga Kid).

The face-painted team comprised Ax (Bill Eadie, a.k.a. the Masked Superstar and Super Machine) and Smash (originally Randy Colley, a.k.a. Moondog Rex, but quickly replaced by Barry Darsow, a.k.a. Krusher Krushchev). They were Vince McMahon’s imitation of the Road Warriors, who had taken the NWA and AWA by storm. But Demolition became a good tag team in its own right, because with Continue reading

The top five lamest 1980s WWF promos

There’s been an awful lot of talk about how some longtime pro wrestling stars, such as the Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Jerry “The King” Lawler, have swooped into angles on WWE Monday Night Raw and delivered promos better than anyone else on the current roster.

Let’s face it: The on-the-job training for interviews was a lot better in yesteryear. In the 1980s, the WWF had a lot of wrestlers and managers who could talk well on the microphone. People like Roddy Piper, Randy “Macho Man” Savage, Hulk Hogan, and Jake “The Snake” Roberts understood how to push matches and angles.

However, more than a few promos in that decade were stinkers, which made me ponder the worst ones I had heard during the ‘80s. One of my qualifications here is that it had to be an interview that anyone could have seen (so house show promos really can’t count). And a bad segment doesn’t mean you gave a bad promo, as plenty of gifted talkers have been saddled with lousy circumstances (think about some of those corny Saturday Night’s Main Event skits). 

Instead, my choices are reserved for those who truly butchered the art of the pro wrestling promo. With that, below are my five lamest promos from the ‘80s:  Continue reading

My first WWF card at the Boston Garden featured Backlund, Muraco, and an ornery Executioner

It was 29 years ago this month that I attended my first pro wrestling card, a WWF show at the old Boston Garden. As the program image at the top of my blog shows, the main event for that afternoon was WWF Champion Bob Backlund against the Magnificent Muraco, who blew off their house show feud in the 15-foot-high 8-foot-high steel cage.

At one point Muraco missed a dive off the top rope as he tried to jam his taped spike thumb into Backlund’s throat. Backlund eventually escaped the cage (no pinfalls in WWF cages in those days), and I remember fans throwing trash at Muraco as he left the ring after the match.

One of the undercard bouts also still sticks with me Continue reading

Could Husky Harris be the next Moondog for WWE?

Those of us watching WWE Monday Night Raw have seen that Husky Harris (the son of Mike Rotundo and grandson of Blackjack Mulligan) has joined Wade Barrett and crew in Nexus.

Watching Harris try to fit into that group just doesn’t seem natural to me. When Harris was in WWE NXT, he had an unusual charisma that got him noticed beyond his less-than-great-genetics look.

I couldn’t help but think that Harris has the appearance and likely the personality to pull of the next wildman character in the WWE. In fact, Harris reminds me of a gimmick I haven’t thought of seriously in a long time: The Moondogs.

Harris actually resembles Continue reading