Tagged: Jim Neidhart

Bundy’s five count, Rude’s gyrations, and other heel traits from the ’80s

Man, I don’t know if it’s just nostalgia blinding me or if things really were different way back when, but it seems like heel mannerisms — the little actions or details that set one wrestler apart from another — are a lost art these days in the WWE.

Sure, Daniel Bryan has his “Yes! Yes! Yes!” chant, and sometimes Dolph Ziggler does a handstand during his matches. But I can remember the trademark mannerisms of so many more bad guys from the 1980s WWF scene. For example:

  • “Mr. Wonderful” Paul Orndorff flicking the sweat off his brow onto a vanquished opponent. Continue reading

7 WWF stars from the 1980s who could have helped the Boston Celtics

With the Boston Celtics battling it out with the Miami Heat in the NBA East Finals, I wondered about what nostalgic reinforcement the WWF could have provided the Celts from decades past: Continue reading

Remembering Bret Hart’s progression from tag teams to icon

It struck me after watching Monday Night Raw this week just how enduring Bret “Hitman” Hart is as a WWE star.

Hart and, ironically, Shawn Michaels, are probably the only wrestlers who grew out the tag team ranks of the 1980s to become huge singles stars (granted, the WWF tag team division Continue reading

Saturday Night’s Main Event often featured two-of-three-fall contests

This week on Monday Night Raw, we saw Dolph Ziggler retain the U.S. Title against Kofi Kingston in a two-out-of-three falls bout, which is a match not often seen these days in the WWE. Wasn’t that a surprise to see fans vote for that option?

In the 1980s, it was more common to see two-out-of-three falls, particularly when the WWF would displace Saturday Night Live on NBC with Saturday Night’s Main Event.

All of the three-fall contests on Saturday Night’s Main Event occurred in Continue reading

The top five lamest 1980s WWF promos

There’s been an awful lot of talk about how some longtime pro wrestling stars, such as the Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Jerry “The King” Lawler, have swooped into angles on WWE Monday Night Raw and delivered promos better than anyone else on the current roster.

Let’s face it: The on-the-job training for interviews was a lot better in yesteryear. In the 1980s, the WWF had a lot of wrestlers and managers who could talk well on the microphone. People like Roddy Piper, Randy “Macho Man” Savage, Hulk Hogan, and Jake “The Snake” Roberts understood how to push matches and angles.

However, more than a few promos in that decade were stinkers, which made me ponder the worst ones I had heard during the ‘80s. One of my qualifications here is that it had to be an interview that anyone could have seen (so house show promos really can’t count). And a bad segment doesn’t mean you gave a bad promo, as plenty of gifted talkers have been saddled with lousy circumstances (think about some of those corny Saturday Night’s Main Event skits). 

Instead, my choices are reserved for those who truly butchered the art of the pro wrestling promo. With that, below are my five lamest promos from the ‘80s:  Continue reading

UFC 118’s crowd fights harken back to the old Boston Garden wrestling atmosphere

In his bout-by-bout report from UFC 118 in Boston on the Wrestling Observer’s website, Dave Meltzer made a few mentions about fights taking place in the stands at the TD Garden. “Another fight in the crowd. I think they’re going for the record,” Meltzer wrote.

Wow, have times changed in Boston. When I started going to WWF cards in 1981 in the old Boston Garden, you pretty much were guaranteed to see several real scraps in the crowd during each show.

The reasons for the fights ranged from people just being drunk to arguments about Continue reading