Tagged: Bob Orton

Debating the merits of the worst sibling wrestlers in the 1980s

There was a good post on the Camel Clutch Blog about the worst brothers in wrestling’s annals.

“They are the most disappointing wrestling siblings in the history of professional wrestling,” the post states.

Three of families involved in the article have ties to 1980s WWF wrestling, all of which I have my own opinions on: Continue reading

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Bundy’s five count, Rude’s gyrations, and other heel traits from the ’80s

Man, I don’t know if it’s just nostalgia blinding me or if things really were different way back when, but it seems like heel mannerisms — the little actions or details that set one wrestler apart from another — are a lost art these days in the WWE.

Sure, Daniel Bryan has his “Yes! Yes! Yes!” chant, and sometimes Dolph Ziggler does a handstand during his matches. But I can remember the trademark mannerisms of so many more bad guys from the 1980s WWF scene. For example:

  • “Mr. Wonderful” Paul Orndorff flicking the sweat off his brow onto a vanquished opponent. Continue reading

Hogan and Snuka headlined first NESN taping in Boston in May 1985

It was 26 years ago this month that the old Boston Garden finally made the big-time when it came to WWF wrestling: New England Sports Network, or NESN to us locals, began broadcasting the house shows live on cable.

It always puzzled me in the early 1980s why Madison Square Garden, the Philadelphia Spectrum, and the Capital Centre in Maryland had cameras taping their matches, but Boston did not. At the time, the WWF came to Boston 11 or 12 times a year for near-monthly cards.

Attendance didn’t seem to suffer at the shows because of the NESN telecasts. During that period, we saw the two largest crowds Continue reading

Before Rock and Orton, other pro wrestling sons competed at WrestleMania

The WWE likes to make a big deal of its second- and third-generation wrestlers. WrestleMania 27 at the Georgia Dome was no exception, as the event saw four multi-generational superstars appear, including the Rock (grandson of “High Chief” Peter Maivia and son of Rocky Johnson), Alberto Del Rio (son of Mexican star Dos Caras), Cody Rhodes (son of “American Dream” Dusty Rhodes), and Randy Orton (grandson of Bob Orton, Sr., and son of Cowboy Bob Orton).

But sons of pro wrestlers are nothing new. Did you know if you go all the way back to the first WrestleMania in 1985 at Madison Square Garden, there were also four second-generation wrestlers who competed? Here’s a list of them: Continue reading

Bob Backlund wrestled an impressive array of challengers in 1982

Bob Backlund gets a bad rap these days. Most fans either remember him as the nutty heel who turned on Bret Hart in 1994 and briefly won the WWF Title before losing it to Diesel (better known as Kevin Nash), or worse, they remember his tenure acting as a kook for TNA Wrestling.

But for those of us who grew up watching pro wrestling in the early 1980s, Backlund was one of the biggest stars. Continue reading

How do the sons of Cowboy Bob Orton and Mr. Perfect stack up today?

There are plenty of good 1980s references in my latest post on Camel Clutch Blog, “Comparing the WWE second-generation wrestlers to their fathers.”

In the post, I attempt to decide who among the current crop of second- and third-generation WWE stars have pulled ahead of their forefathers. I talk about the sons and daughters of such ’80s WWF  names as Cowboy Bob Orton, “Mr. Perfect” Curt Hennig, and Jimmy “Superfly” Snuka. Check it out if you have a chance, and thanks to my friends at Camel Clutch Blog for posting the piece.

Sammartino vs. Piper: The angle began at MSG, but the feud lit up Boston

In a prior post I remembered how Piper’s Pit occasionally hit the road on house shows as an added attraction.

WWF legend Bruno Sammartino appeared on two of these Piper’s Pits: one at the Boston Garden and a far more notorious one Continue reading